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eth2 quick update no. 21 Posted by Danny Ryan on November 27, 2020 Research & Development

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eth2 quick update no. 21                                                  Posted by Danny Ryan on November 27, 2020                                                                                          Research & Development

Minimum ETH threshold hit 🎉; genesis on December 1st, 12pm UTC Get your nodes running! and monitor updates through genesis 👀

Eth2 genesis, December 1st. Get ready!

This week, the deposit contract hit the minimum threshold of 16384 32-ETH validator deposits, kicking genesis into motion. Genesis time is 1606824023 – that is, December 1, 2020, 12:00:23pm UTC.

If you made genesis deposits, please make sure you’re an active participant this week.

Set up your node 🖥

It’s time to configure your node. Sync your eth1 client (start now! this can take some time), set up your favorite eth2 client, and load up your validators.

Check out the Launch Pad’s Eth2 Staker Checklist for the minimum steps you should perform before genesis.

Monitor updates through genesis 👀

Although all eth2 clients have cut mainnet v1.0 releases, keep your eye on any developments through genesis. In the event that your eth2 client cuts a release 24 hours before genesis, it’s likely for a very good reason and you should be on top of it.

Join your client’s discord, and if they have a mailing list, sign up!

  • Lighthouse – https://discord.gg/cyAszAh
  • Nimbus – https://discord.gg/XRxWahP
  • Prysm – https://discord.gg/XkyZSSk4My
  • Teku – https://discord.gg/7hPv2T6

In addition to the client-specific resources, I highly recommend joining the ethstaker discord. It’s a great place to ask questions and share information, and I expect it to be very active through genesis. If there is something you need to know, it will very likely surface there.

Thank you and congratulations

I wanted to offer another huge thank you and congratulations to everyone who has helped make this a reality. I couldn’t be more excited to see the Ethereum community finally bootstrap this new proof-of-stake consensus mechanism.

Although there is still much work to do, it’s a good time to take a deep breath and smile.

Happy staking 🚀

EthereumJS VM v5 Release Posted by The EF JavaScript Team on November 26, 2020 Research & Development

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EthereumJS VM v5 Release                                                  Posted by The EF JavaScript Team on November 26, 2020                                                                                          Research & Development

While everyone is staring in amazement on December 1st, 12pm UTC anticipating the Eth 2.0 Beaconchain genesis, within the JavaScript team we quietly prepared our own little genesis release in the shadows. Being very much around the good ol’ Eth 1.0 chain we are nevertheless very much excited on this too. 😀

Some background story: the EthereumJS ecosystem around the VM consists of a very modular set of libraries (vm, blockchain, merkle-patricia-tree, tx,…), each encapsulating its own dedicated set of functionality. While this is great for the user, it turned out to be not so great for development since it often becomes necessary to do changes on several libraries at once which is hard and time-consuming to act upon in a consistency-preserving way having the libraries in different repositories. So early this year we decided to update our setup and combine the VM-related libraries within a single monorepo. This is a single repository where it gets possible to target changes on several libraries within a single pull request and run all the different library test suites along all together to ensure consistency. At the same time benefits from having multiple packages all released individually remain.

Since the switch to the monorepo our development activity literally exploded. 😋 We discovered so many things that we wanted to make better that we just couldn’t stop, especially since one change often triggered another which was now just “so obvious to do”. 😜

So we developed. And developed. And developed. Basically throughout the whole year. That is the main reason why you heard relatively little from us during the last months, we were just so busy with all this stuff.

While at the end of the process we sometimes wondered if we would ever get things together again (see our extensive release notes to get a feeling for what I mean), I am really proud today that I am able to finally announce: we did it. 😋 Thanks to an amazing team for all the great and dedicated work on this. 🎉

This is not one but six major releases on our main libraries with our virtual machine at the forefront:

In this post we won’t go much into the technical details and rather give a high level overview. For a more complete picture see the release notes linked above, we really cared for making these comprise and readable and give a good overview on all the relevant (breaking) changes.

Maybe just one important note: we switched to a new naming scheme along these releases and you need to use the new names to get the new versions. The former ethereumjs-vm package e.g. now installs as follows:

npm install @ethereumjs/vm 

Ok. What is actually in it? Let’s have a quick look.

All Hardforks

EthereumJS VM v5 now supports all hardforks back to genesis. This is a primer in the history of JavaScript Ethereum and we hope that this will open up for various potentially exciting new use cases. We have got our own, more on this below.

A VM on a specific HF can be started with:

import VM from '@ethereumjs/vm' import Common from '@ethereumjs/common'  const common = new Common({ chain: 'mainnet', hardfork: 'spuriousDragon' }) const vm = new VM({ common }) 

An EIP-centric VM

While hardforks are great to bundle a set of agreed changes together a hardfork-centric VM has turned out to not be flexible enough to enable a future-driven development where it is not finalized for quite some time which EIPs will make it into a new hardfork (the Berlin hardfork seems to be the best example for this yet).

With the new VM release the internal functional modularization layer has been reworked. This allows for EIPs to now become native citizens within the VM. A VM with a special set of EIPs can be instantiated as follows:

import Common from '@ethereumjs/common' import VM from '@ethereumjs/vm'  const common = new Common({ chain: 'mainnet', eips: [2537] }) const vm = new VM({ common }) 

As a starter we support the following new EIPs (mostly targeted for the Berlin hardfork) with the VM v5release:

TypeScript

On this EthereumJS release cycle we can confidently say that we holistically brought our libraries to a modern technology stack. One big part of this: with the new releases we are closing in on our long planned and executed upon TypeScript transition and all our major libraries as well as internal dependencies are now written in TypeScript.

Just a peak what makes TypeScript so great and helps to make our libraries more robust and secure: TypeScript is a superset of JavaScript and let developers know the data types for each variable and each object used in the code. Is the variable called address a string or a binary Buffer object? While you get no explicit hints about this in JavaScript – which highly increases the risk for follow-up developer mistakes – in TypeScript you will know for sure.

It also gets a lot more fun to work on our libraries directly or use the libraries within a third-party project since as a developer you can now get hints like this in the IDE throughout the whole code base:

EthereumJS VM v5 Release                                                  Posted by The EF JavaScript Team on November 26, 2020                                                                                          Research & Development

Your development environment with proper TypeScript typing now just knows that a blockchain variable is an @ethereumjs/blockchain object (hold on with your remarks, Go and Rust developers 😅 ) and not just “something”. So our own code gets respectively your (TypeScript) code will get a lot more readable on using the new library versions.

Promises

If you are not too much into JavaScript you can skip this section, but if you are a JavaScript developer you will likely sigh with relief on these news so we will at least give this a short mention:

Another transition finalized, all library APIs are now working with JavaScript Promises. So no more callbacks anywhere throughout our whole stack.

Library usage changes from:

blockchain.getBlock(blockId, (block) => {   console.log(block) }) 

New API example:

const block = await blockchain.getBlock(blockId) console.log(block) 

The little indentation on this first example might not seem to mean much on first sight. On several of these old style calls nested together you get deeper and deeper though and at some point code becomes unreadable. Just google “callback hell” if you are interested on how this can look like. 🙂 Promises allow for writing significantly more readable code.

Library Refactorings

It’s sometimes a bit hard to imagine on the necessity of an engine change if the car is still running, nevertheless at some point it gets a necessity if you want to safely get through the next 10.000 miles. With refactoring in software it is often a bit similar. 😀 With this release series we reworked the fundamentals of some of our most central libraries and our block, our tx and partly our blockchain library received a significant rewrite.

It should now be a lot easier to work with these libraries and they should be well-prepared to provide a solid and secure basis to be build upon within the Ethereum JavaScript ecosystem for the years to come.

Outlook

We hope that you like our new releases. This post can just provide a sneak peak on the most important changes and things are covered in a lot more detail within the release notes linked at the beginning of this post. We are happy to hear your feedback on our Discord server or our new @EFJavaScript twitter account.

For ourselves these releases provide some solid ground to move to a more future-guided development cycle and we are eagerly looking forward to see this come into play. With the VM having all hardforks implemented it now gets possible to integrate the VM into our revamped EthereumJS Client project. We won’t join mainnet with this client anytime soon. But we will nevertheless become able to do our share to help improve on client diversity. The new client in its first stages will allow us to join development testnets like Yolo v2 (and following) and actively help to discover and protect against consensus bugs between clients. We will also be able to more actively contribute to future protocol research and participate in eventually following research implementations. You will hear more on this once we have a first usable version of our client ready (targeting fullsync on Yolo v2), this will be early next year.

For now we wish everyone a contemplative end of the year being complemented by an exciting beaconchain launch day (week)! 🚀

The EF JavaScript Team

Allocation Update: Q3 2020 Posted by Ecosystem Support Program Team on November 25, 2020 Ecosystem Support Program

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Allocation Update: Q3 2020                                                  Posted by Ecosystem Support Program Team on November 25, 2020                                                                                          Ecosystem Support Program

It’s quarterly update time again! The big news is is the Q3 grantees, of course, but we always like to share what else the ESP team has been up to. A few things we’ve knocked out lately:

  • Added a Guide to ESP on our website. Here you’ll find details on our mission, what we look for in the projects we support, types of support we provide, our process for accepting and evaluating grant proposals, and more.
  • Published the first in a series of monthly roundups where we’ll share progress on ongoing grants.
  • Participated in events from meetups in Bangkok and Sao Paolo to virtual hackathons hosted by ETHGlobal, ETHPlanet, and Web3Bridge.

And of course, we got grants out to lots of excellent teams. Here’s the list:

Category Grantee Description
Community & education BlockchainsForSchools Sponsorship of BlockchainsForHacks, an ideation challenge for high school and college students to create innovative projects using blockchain technology.
Cryptography & zero knowledge proofs Hubble Continued funding for work on an optimistic rollup hub allowing creation of any rollup chain simply by writing a solidity function.
Cryptography & zero knowledge proofs Zkopru (zk-optimistic-rollup) Layer-2 scaling solution for private transactions using zk-SNARKs and optimistic rollup. Github: https://github.com/zkopru-network/zkopru
Cryptography & zero knowledge proofs Dark Forest Game theorietic research completed by a group of Stanford students on using zk-SNARKs to construct “incomplete information” environments where users can keep a private state while publicly submitting verifiably valid actions. Dark Forest was created to demonstrate the capability of this framework to create complex environmental and strategic dynamics in decentralized gaming.
Cryptography & zero knowledge proofs Semaphore RLN Method for preventing spam when using Semaphore, a zero-knowledge gadget for anonymous proof of membership. RLN (Rate Limiting Nullifier)reveals the private key of an account signaling above an acceptable rate, which another member can use to remove them from the group.
Cryptography & zero knowledge proofs ETH Summer Program for students to learn about and build on Ethereum, including contributions to 4byte.directory.
Cryptography & zero knowledge proofs Aztec Continued work on PLONK, including delivery of Ultra-PLONK, which adds PLOOKUP gates; development of a domain-specific language and compiler; and prover upgrades.
Cryptography & zero knowledge proofs Blind Find v1 Peer-to-peer network allowing private peer search: one user can locate another via provable pathways between multiple peers without revealing any information about the connection.
Cryptography & zero knowledge proofs Quadratic Dollar Homepage Smart contracts and web UI for a Quadratic Dollar Homepage, inspired by the Million Dollar Homepage. Users determine the prominence of images on a web page via quadratic voting, using Minimal Anti-Collusion Infrastructure (MACI) for collusion resistance.
Developer experience & tooling Hardhat Improvements to Hardhat (formerly known as Buildler), a development environment for compiling, deploying, testing, and debugging Ethereum software, built and maintained by Nomic Labs.
Developer experience & tooling formalize.eth Verified compiler from a subset of Vyper to YUL, written in Coq.
Developer experience & tooling IPLD, Object Signing and Encryption Joint funded with Protocol Labs: research by Textile and 3box into cryptographically securing data in IPLD, the linked data framework used by IPFS, to enable scalable and interactive dapps using both IPFS and Ethereum.
Ethereum 1.x Web3 Labs Continued maintenance and improvements to the Web3j library including Solidity library dependency management, smart contract migration support, Web3j Solidity debugger enhancements amd integration for IntelliJ/Android Studio, and Eth2 support.
Ethereum 1.x Whiteblock Testnet and experimentation to understand the impact, including uncle rates and block propagation times, of larger block sizes resulting from implementation of EIP-1559, reduction in calldata gas cost, and/or increase in gas limit.
Ethereum 1.x OpenEthereum Maintenance and development on OpenEthereum, a takeover of the Parity client spearheaded by Gnosis.
Ethereum 1.x Imapp Testing, including creation and deployment of a set of sample programs on various machines, operating systems and EVMs, to estimate gas costs and dependencies for EVM computation, with the goal of addressing imbalanced gas costs for EVM instructions.
Ethereum 2.0 bitfly Continued work on beaconcha.in, an open-source eth2 block explorer providing support for eth2 testnets. Github: https://github.com/gobitfly/eth2-beaconchain-explorer
Indirect funding MetaCartel DAO Contribution to a DAO funding microgrants and mentoring for post-hackathon and early stage teams.
Indirect funding Gitcoin CLR CLR matching for rounds 6-8.
Layer 2 Burn Auction Censorship-resistant block creation mechanism for Optimistic Rollups wherein the right to create a new block to is auctioned to the person willing to burn the most ETH.
Layer 2 State Channels Continued development of State Channels including audit, server wallet, SDK, improved documentation and mainnet implementation.
Layer 2 Fuel Labs Further development of the Fuel optimistic rollup.
Layer 2 Connext Framework enabling cross-chain communication using state channels.
User experience Least Authority Audit of GSN v2 contracts.
User experience EIP 1559 R&D Dual grant to the EIP-1559 multisig to support community-wide efforts, and ConsenSys for coordination of research and development.

Total awarded in Q3: $2,400,000

These teams, along with so many others, have done exceptional work in an exceptionally complicated year. As we cruise toward the close of 2020, we’re as excited and optimistic as ever for what they’ll go on to accomplish in 2021 and beyond.

Grantee Roundup: November 2020 Posted by Ecosystem Support Program Team on November 18, 2020 Ecosystem Support Program

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Grantee Roundup: November 2020                                                  Posted by Ecosystem Support Program Team on November 18, 2020                                                                                          Ecosystem Support Program

It’s always fun to hear about new grants as they’re awarded, but what happens after the announcement? In this series, we’ll check in on projects that are well underway – or already at the finish line. Read on to learn about some recent milestones and achievements by grantees!

Where applicable, the grant recipient is listed first, followed by the project for which the grant was awarded.

Fuel Labs for Optimistic Rollup R&D, SparsENS

Fuel Labs is best known for their work on a UTXO-based design for scalable, trust-minimized optimistic rollups. This multitasking team is also developing SparsENS, a stateless ENS subdomain registrar aiming to reduce transaction costs for registering ENS subdomains. Fuel Labs’ grant went toward both these efforts, and in recent months they have hit some major milestones:

Keep an eye out for a SparsENS testnet around the end of the year, and watch the Fuel roadmap for new features and future version releases!

Nomic Labs for Buidler Hardhat

Hardhat, formerly known as Buidler, is a flexible and extensible development environment. The recent Hardhat release represented both a major evolution of the protocol, and a new chapter for a project that has matured from a side project into an indispensable tool for Ethereum developers. The release brought a long list of improvements and new features, including:

  • Mainnet forking to simulate mainnet state in a local development environment
  • Tenderly integration for advanced debugging and monitoring directly in the Hardhat workflow
  • Revamped compilation pipeline for improved compilation speed and the ability to configure arbitrarily complex compilation setups
  • Improved support for ethers.js and Typescript
  • And many more! You can find the full list here.

The Hardhat release included breaking changes, so be sure to upgrade if you’re working with an older version of Buidler!

Hubble Optimistic Rollup Hub

Hubble enables deployment of programmable optimistic rollup chains within a single hub, allowing users to move between chains within the rollup space instantly and cheaply. The initial Hubble grant was recently completed, with final milestones including:

  • Transfer-only testnet launch with batched deposits, single withdraws, CLI and REST APIs, on-chain verification and fraud proofs
  • Testnet upgrades including transaction and deposit fees, BLS signatures, and variable length balance and PDA trees
  • Documentation for the Hubble libraries, APIs and commands

Hubble will continue to develop as time goes on – in fact, a second grant has recently been awarded for development of a front end interface allowing users to interact with Hubble’s BLS signature scheme. Hubble is not owned by any one person or project, but you can follow its progress on the very lively Hubble Project Github repo!

We promised ourselves we’d keep this post light, but we can’t resist adding just a few more:

The list never stops growing, so we’ll be back next month with another round!

Medalla data challenge results Posted by Lakshman Sankar & Danny Ryan on November 17, 2020 Research & Development

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Medalla data challenge results                                                  Posted by Lakshman Sankar & Danny Ryan on November 17, 2020                                                                                          Research & Development

The EF is excited to announce the results of the Medalla data challenge, a data hackathon focused on the Medalla testnet ✨

The prompt was open-ended: we asked for data tools, visualizations, and analyses of testnet data; in short, anything that would help the community make sense of all the data.

Over the course of six weeks we received 23 submissions from a wide variety of teams. We were pleased to see high quality submissions for every category.

Prizes are divided into three tiers based on scope, extensibility, and usefulness to the community.

🥇 Gold ($15k prize)

  • Jim McDonald – chaind, a tool for extracting data from a running eth2 client and storing it in a PostgreSQL database. Notably, this tool was used by multiple other teams who submitted to the data challenge.
  • Pintail – a series of blog posts (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) comparing client performance, studying network behavior, and discussing validator effectiveness.

🥈 Silver ($5k prize)

  • Sid Shekhar and Elias Simos – a wide-ranging study of eth2 data.
  • Evgeny Medvedev of Nansen – an extension of the ethereum-etl tool to eth2, as well as a BigQuery database dump of eth2 data.
  • Nate McKervey of Splunk – a blog post and dashboard studying Ethereum network health.

🥉 Bronze ($1k prize)

Looking forward

The aims of this contest were to welcome new minds into the Ethereum community, encourage them to pore over eth2 data, make it easier to parse and analyse, and provide valuable insights to both developers and the community at large. To that end, the competition has been a great success, and we suspect that many of the tools and analyses produced will be useful as mainnet goes live.

If you’re interested in picking up where any of these submissions left off, please consider applying for a staking community grant!

eth2 quick update no. 20 Posted by Danny Ryan on November 13, 2020 Research & Development

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eth2 quick update no. 20                                                  Posted by Danny Ryan on November 13, 2020                                                                                          Research & Development

tl;dr

Staking community grants

This week the EF announced the Eth2 Staking Community Grants round in an effort to support a more delightful staking experience.

This is an open call for proposals for grants that aim to enhance all things staking – tools, documentation, educational resources, etc.

Check it out for more details including a non-exhaustive wishlist.

Proposals are due by December 22nd!

v1.0 eth2 testnets – Toledo and Pyrmont

This week, client developers led by protolambda launched the Toledo devnet – a 16k validator testnet with v1.0 mainnet configuration. Although you can sync up your favorite node to this testnet, you cannot make any validator deposits due to the use of a modified, permissioned deposit contract. Toledo is for initial v1.0 testing and continued developer experimentation.

Next week, we aim to launch Pyrmont – a 100k validator testnet mimicking mainnet conditions as closely as possible. Once Pyrmont is launched and stable, the testnet will be opened up to the community. Pyrmont can serve as a final place to test mainnet software releases and hardware setups in the run-up to mainnet launch.

Because Pyrmont uses mainnet configuration, it is subject to the same (slow) activation queue mechanics you might experience on mainnet. Please be a good citizen and only make one or two validator deposits. This will keep the queue times reasonable in the next few weeks and allow for a productive testbed for all users.

Pyrmont will be supported at least through eth2 mainnet genesis. From there, we will consider the options available to construct a long-term testnet with better stability and UX properties. This would likely include faster queue processing and a much higher minimum ejection balance.

But until then, enjoy Pyrmont!

Mainnet deposits

In case you didn’t catch it last week, the eth2 mainnet deposit contract is live along with the mainnet Launch Pad. The mainnet deposit contract lives at the following address – 0x00000000219ab540356cBB839Cbe05303d7705Fa. Please triple-check this address before sending any funds anywhere.

A quick reminder – although the MIN_GENESIS_TIME is December 1st, 12pm UTC, there is a 7-day GENESIS_DELAY. This means that to ensure you get your deposits included in the genesis block, you must get them on-chain before November 24, 12pm UTC.

For a more detailed discussion of how genesis is kicked off, see Ben Edgington’s genesis writeup.

Happy staking 🚀

eth2 quick update no. 18 Posted by Danny Ryan on October 1, 2020 Research & Development

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eth2 quick update no. 18                                                  Posted by Danny Ryan on October 1, 2020                                                                                          Research & Development

Oh you, Spadina, Finally, finality Hello and farewell 

tl;dr

  • A quick Spadina postmortem
  • New testnet: Zinken. Launchpad is live; Genesis deposits due in one week!

Spadina Postmortem

The Spadina testnet dress rehearsal launched this past Tuesday. Although Spadina is now healthy and finalizing, the launch was not as smooth sailing as it could have been. Validator participation started very low, and it took ~70 epochs (almost 8 hours) to get up to the 2/3 participation threshold needed for the chain to finalize. Since then however, the chain has actually been remarkably stable.

At first, we thought this lack of early finality was due to the fact that, since validators are only staking testnet ETH, there are no real disincentives for failing to turn on your node in time for genesis. But it soon became clear that, although this was part of the problem, there were some errors near the edge of the stack with regards to client release and configuration.

A side note on client diversity – Spadina was heavily weighted toward the Prysm client which had a critical peering issue at genesis. At this point in time there are many robust eth2 clients. If we achieve a better distribution for mainnet, single client issues, like we saw on Spadina, will have a much smaller overall impact on network health.

If the problem was just low initial participation, there wouldn’t be a need for another dress rehearsal, but since many users experienced critical issues getting their nodes up and running, we’re opting for another crack at it before the deposit contract is launched and a mainnet genesis date is set. Enter Zinken.

Announcing Zinken

Zinken is another eth2 testnet launch aimed at giving client teams a chance to iron out issues in their release process, and validators a chance to experience a smoother genesis prior to mainnet.

In the optimal case, Zinken is stable and finalizes out of the gate. However, the most important signal we’re looking for is for users to have minimal issues configuring their nodes and joining the network. A lot of this rests on the client teams putting out solid releases, but we also ask users to take this genesis seriously.

This means only making deposits for validators you intend to run, and, if at all possible, keeping an eye on the ethstaker and client team discords during the 24 hours leading up to genesis; there is always a small chance you may need to perform a last minute configuration change or node upgrade.

The important details:

  • The Zinken Launchpad is live today.
  • Genesis deposits are due by Thursday, October 8th at 12 UTC.
  • Genesis time is expected to be approximately Monday, October 12th at 12 UTC.

Note that Genesis deposits are due 4 days before launch. If you deposit after this, your validator won’t be activated immediately. Instead, you’ll be added to a queue and slowly inducted into the validator set once the chain starts finalizing.

As with Spadina, the primary goal of Zinken is to practice the genesis process. This means that, although the testnet may run for longer, client teams and ecosystem tools will only provide support for a few days.

If this is your first eth2 testnet, be sure to check out the EthStaker Discord for tips and discussion. From there, you should be able to pick a client and make your way into the client-specific Discords.

Happy testnet 🚀

eth2 quick update no. 17 Posted by Danny Ryan on September 22, 2020 Research & Development

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eth2 quick update no. 17                                                  Posted by Danny Ryan on September 22, 2020                                                                                          Research & Development

📣 Last chance to practice genesis before mainnet 📣

tl;dr

Announcing Spadina Launchpad

As of today, the Spadina Launchpad is live 🎉

If you are unfamiliar – Spadina is a rapid-fire dress-rehearsal eth2 testnet to be launched on September 29th with a 3 day end-of-life. If you’re interested in testing out your deposit and genesis chops one last time before mainnet launch, then Spadina is for you – submit deposits today! Check out the quick update from last week for more discussion on the what and why of Spadina.

If this is your first eth2 testnet, be sure to check out the EthStaker Discord for tips and discussion. From there, you should be able to pick a client and make your way into the client-specific discords.

Deposit CLI audit complete

The eth2 community is currently engaged in a wave of audits on everything from specs to cryptographic libraries to clients and command-line tools.

We’re excited to announce that Trail of Bits just completed the audit of the eth2.0-deposit-cli – a tool we expect to be widely used by hobbyist stakers in conjunction with the Launchpad. The cli development team is currently working through the 10 findings and code quality recommendations found in the report. You can follow their progress here.

In addition to this audit, there are many on-going audits of the eth2 client software. Keep your eye on this issue to keep track of the latest developments.

EIP 2982

Last week, Vitalik and I released EIP-2982: Serenity Phase 0.

Although it triggered a debate amongst the editors, the release of this EIP (✅), together with the selection of the final v1.0 mainnet parameters and the launch of the deposit contract (tbd, very soon), are some of the final remaining milestones before mainnet.

Phase 0 mainnet is coming soon (no “™️” necessary), and everyone involved is making their final preparations for launch🚀

eth2 quick update no. 14 🏅 testnet edition Posted by Danny Ryan on August 3, 2020 Research & Development

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eth2 quick update no. 14                                             🏅 testnet edition                                                                 Posted by Danny Ryan on August 3, 2020                                                                                          Research & Development

All eyes on Medalla testnet – genesis in less than 24 hours 👀

tl;dr

Medalla testnet launches tomorrow 🏅

The minimum validator deposits (16k+ of them) required to kick off the Medalla testnet were met on Friday, which means the genesis of this testnet is set to happen at 1596546008 Unix time, or 8 seconds after August 4th at 1pm UTC. If you’re curious as to how that time is calculated, check out Ben Edgington’s quick genesis explainer.

eth2 quick update no. 14                                             🏅 testnet edition                                                                 Posted by Danny Ryan on August 3, 2020                                                                                          Research & Development

The launch of Medalla is a huge milestone in the development of eth2 – if Medalla proves stable, mainnet launch is next – and represents years of hardwork by countless engineers, researchers, and community members. We hope you are as excited as we are :).

Remember, the vast majority of validators on the Medalla testnet are run by you, the community. We’re relying on you to treat this as a dress rehearsal for mainnet launch – have your nodes running well in advance, keep an eye on your validator’s performance, and be on the lookout for any critical updates to your client’s software (in other words, treat your testnet validators as if they’re securing real ETH).

Client diversity 👯‍♀️

The community will be running five different clients at genesis!

A huge congratulations goes out to each of these teams. If you are running any of the above clients, make sure to thank the client team and consider dropping some ETH or DAI into their tipjars. They have more than earned it.

Don’t forget! Medalla has special POAP NFTs for running each client type at launch. Read up on the details here 🏅

ethstaker, a community resource

In addition to the extraordinary work carried out by the eth2 client teams, I’d like to highlight ethstaker – a burgeoning user-driven resource for the fledgling validator community. This community-run effort aims to provide a home to the hobbyist staking community in the form of a subreddit and discord server.

I’ve spent a little bit of time on the discord this past week, and it’s a great place to share information, ask (and answer!) technical questions, and generally just collaborate around the new and exciting eth2 staking technology. If you are staking on Medalla or are interested in getting involved, definitely check it out.

I expect ethstaker, along with the client-specific discords, to be a must for validators looking to keep up to date with all things validator-related.

mc-attack-0 attacknet launch

mc-attack-0, a new multi-client attacknet, launched today!

This new attacknet falls under the beta-1 categorization with updated rules and increased bounties – up to $15k for critical exploits.

Since the launch of the initial beta-0 attacknets, we’ve awarded for the following attacks:

  • $5000 awarded to Jonny Rhea for performing a simple DoS attack on teku-attack-0, highlighting some missing basic DoS protections in JVM-libp2p
  • 🏆💪🐿 awarded to Martin Swende for finding a critical bug in Prysm SSZ decoding, which allowed a remote attacker to crash nodes on prysm-attack-0 (no monetary award due to Martin working on security at the EF)
  • $5000 awarded to AlexSSD7 for performing an L4 DDoS on prysm-attack-0, halting finality on the 4-node network and highlighting a clock-skew that prevented nodes from mending themselves after the attack
  • $1000 awarded (honorable mention) to Jonny Rhea for taking down the discovery mechanism in lighthouse-attack-0

As always, join us in the Eth R&D discord #attacknet channel for discussions and tips to get started 🚀

eth2 quick update no. 14 🏅 testnet edition Posted by Danny Ryan on August 3, 2020 Research & Development

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eth2 quick update no. 14                                             🏅 testnet edition                                                                 Posted by Danny Ryan on August 3, 2020                                                                                          Research & Development

All eyes on Medalla testnet – genesis in less than 24 hours 👀

tl;dr

Medalla testnet launches tomorrow 🏅

The minimum validator deposits (16k+ of them) required to kick off the Medalla testnet were met on Friday, which means the genesis of this testnet is set to happen at 1596546008 Unix time, or 8 seconds after August 4th at 1pm UTC. If you’re curious as to how that time is calculated, check out Ben Edgington’s quick genesis explainer.

eth2 quick update no. 14                                             🏅 testnet edition                                                                 Posted by Danny Ryan on August 3, 2020                                                                                          Research & Development

The launch of Medalla is a huge milestone in the development of eth2 – if Medalla proves stable, mainnet launch is next – and represents years of hardwork by countless engineers, researchers, and community members. We hope you are as excited as we are :).

Remember, the vast majority of validators on the Medalla testnet are run by you, the community. We’re relying on you to treat this as a dress rehearsal for mainnet launch – have your nodes running well in advance, keep an eye on your validator’s performance, and be on the lookout for any critical updates to your client’s software (in other words, treat your testnet validators as if they’re securing real ETH).

Client diversity 👯‍♀️

The community will be running five different clients at genesis!

A huge congratulations goes out to each of these teams. If you are running any of the above clients, make sure to thank the client team and consider dropping some ETH or DAI into their tipjars. They have more than earned it.

Don’t forget! Medalla has special POAP NFTs for running each client type at launch. Read up on the details here 🏅

ethstaker, a community resource

In addition to the extraordinary work carried out by the eth2 client teams, I’d like to highlight ethstaker – a burgeoning user-driven resource for the fledgling validator community. This community-run effort aims to provide a home to the hobbyist staking community in the form of a subreddit and discord server.

I’ve spent a little bit of time on the discord this past week, and it’s a great place to share information, ask (and answer!) technical questions, and generally just collaborate around the new and exciting eth2 staking technology. If you are staking on Medalla or are interested in getting involved, definitely check it out.

I expect ethstaker, along with the client-specific discords, to be a must for validators looking to keep up to date with all things validator-related.

mc-attack-0 attacknet launch

mc-attack-0, a new multi-client attacknet, launched today!

This new attacknet falls under the beta-1 categorization with updated rules and increased bounties – up to $15k for critical exploits.

Since the launch of the initial beta-0 attacknets, we’ve awarded for the following attacks:

  • $5000 awarded to Jonny Rhea for performing a simple DoS attack on teku-attack-0, highlighting some missing basic DoS protections in JVM-libp2p
  • 🏆💪🐿 awarded to Martin Swende for finding a critical bug in Prysm SSZ decoding, which allowed a remote attacker to crash nodes on prysm-attack-0 (no monetary award due to Martin working on security at the EF)
  • $5000 awarded to AlexSSD7 for performing an L4 DDoS on prysm-attack-0, halting finality on the 4-node network and highlighting a clock-skew that prevented nodes from mending themselves after the attack
  • $1000 awarded (honorable mention) to Jonny Rhea for taking down the discovery mechanism in lighthouse-attack-0

As always, join us in the Eth R&D discord #attacknet channel for discussions and tips to get started 🚀

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